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Dr. Oz Recommends Acupuncture

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, November 13, 2013
Daytime Emmy Award winning host of "The Dr. Oz Show" recommends the use of acupuncture. Access this brief video to hear Dr. Oz discuss his visit to a hospital in China where he noted that patients were receiving acupuncture and other Chinese medical treatments and also Western medical care.

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Ensure Your Practice Information in AcuFinder

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, November 13, 2013

When keeping your AAAOM member information current, your name and practice information, will be available to patients seeking a practitioner through both AAAOM’s "Find a Practitioner” function and AcuFinder (www.acufinder.com). You then also:

  1. Receive important emailed AAAOM updates and information pertaining to the profession
  2. Receive the print issue of The American Acupuncturist (or you can select online access only if that’s your preference). Be sure your mailing address is current in the Professional Information section. Please note: AAAOM-SO members can view The American Acupuncturist online
  3. Connect with your peers through links to discussion groups and blogs
  4. Take advantage of our Member Rewards Program

Take the time to update your profile now by clicking here to sign into your member profile. Proceed to "Manage Profile,” click on Edit Profile then update your contact information, American Acupuncturist mailing preferences and bio. If you need assistance or require additional information, please email membership@aaaomonline.org or call 866-455-7999 ext. 4.

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AAAOM Chinese Translators Volunteer Opportunity

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, November 13, 2013
The American Acupuncturist, the peer-reviewed journal published by the AAAOM, wants to add to its reserve of volunteers, individuals who are interested in translating scientific research articles from Chinese into English. We would call upon your services only once or twice a year. Click here to sign up as a Chinese translator.

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Samueli Institute Study: High Impact Training Programs to Help Service Members Cope with Stress

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, November 13, 2013

In a study involving 116 randomized control trials distilled from a pool of nearly 12,000, the Samueli Institute of Alexandria, VA evaluated the impact of stress-reduction programs within a military environment. The study, published in this month's Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, focused on stills-training that builds resilience, eases emotional stress and resets the body's control system that reacts to stress. Areas of concentration included post traumatic stress response, depression and anxiety.

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Acupuncture with Counseling Improved Depression

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Acupuncture and counseling improved outcomes among patients with moderate to severe depression in the United Kingdom, according to data from a randomized trial.

Researchers from the University of York in the UK recruited patients with depression from 27 primary care practices in northern England and randomly assigned participants to acupuncture (n=302), counseling (n=302) or usual care (n=151) to determine the efficacy and cost effectiveness of various treatments. The condition is normally treated using antidepressants and counseling. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are some of commonly prescribed antidepressants.

There were statistically significant reductions in PHQ-9 assessment scores in the acupuncture and counseling groups vs. usual care at three months (–2.46 points for acupuncture, P<.001; –1.73 points for counseling, P=.008). Scores were similar during 12 months: –1.55 points in the acupuncture group and –1.5 in the counseling group. However, there was no significant difference in scores between the acupuncture and counseling groups (P=.41).

"These findings suggest that, compared to usual care alone, both acupuncture and counseling when provided alongside usual care provided significant benefits at three months in primary care to patients with recurring depression," the researchers wrote.


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Huffington Post: Time for Acupuncture to Become Part of Standard Care

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, November 13, 2013

A recent study conducted by researchers in the Integrative Medicine Program at the MD Anderson Cancer Center and published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology helps provide cancer patients and their oncologists the information needed to make choices about the use of acupuncture in symptoms management during cancer programs.

 

Forty-one studies were found for the treatment of eight symptoms including: 11 on pain, 11 on nausea/vomiting, eight on postoperative ileus (constipation), four on xerostomia (dry mouth), seven on hot flashes, three on fatigue, five on anxiety/depression/mood disorders, and three on sleep disturbance. These studies were rated for study quality and whether outcomes were positive or negative. There is reason to believe that with larger, more rigorous studies, acupuncture may be found beneficial for some of these conditions.

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Drug-Free Treatment of Chronic Pain Seen as Way to Cut Prescription Dependency

Posted By Angie Woodward, Wednesday, November 13, 2013

As more and more patients become seriously ill or die as a result of prescription drugs, drug-free techniques, such as acupuncture, physical therapy, and yoga to treat chronic pain, are seen as an important part of a solution to this serious problem.

In her October 7 article, "Finding Drug-Free Techniques to Treat Chronic Pain,” Boston Globe staff writer Deborah Kotz quotes Boston Medical Center internist Dr. Daniel Alford who stated he "would like to see a stronger emphasis placed on non-medical ways to relieve pain, such as massage therapy, acupuncture, physical therapy, and yoga therapies.”

Dr. Aditi Nerurkar, Beth Israel Deaconess primary care physician and assistant medical director at the hospital’s Cheng & Tsui Center for Integrative Care also adds, "I see patients who have everything from back pain to migraines and can send them next door to our acupuncturist or teach them meditation techniques myself.”

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Patient Outcomes and Experiences of an Acupuncture and Self-Care Service for Persistent Low Back Pain: A Mixed Methods Approach

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, November 13, 2013
Supported self-management, acupuncture, and information can help reduce the symptoms of low back pain. These approaches are currently recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence in the U.K. as treatment options for patients with persistent low back pain. However, there has been no previous evaluation of a service providing them together for this common problem. The purpose of a service evaluation project by the Beating Back Pain Service (BBPS) was to report patient outcomes and experiences in a primary and community care setting, delivering acupuncture, self-management, and information to patients with chronic low back pain. The BBPS provided musculoskeletal pain management combining self-management with acupuncture, which was found to be highly effective by patients who completed a questionnaire about their back pain problems after such combined treatment. Further consideration of these methods is required regarding how to best engage patients in self-management

 

 

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Acupuncture Shows Promise to Improve Eyesight for Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Treatments with acupuncture and herbal medicine for retinitis pigmentosa, a disorder that is a genetically inherited condition that may lead to blindness, have demonstrated positive clinical outcomes in several studies. A groundbreaking study was published in 2011 wherein it was discovered that acupuncture protects the optic nerve from damage caused by intraocular pressure by alleviating stresses on retinal and optic nerve axonal ultrastructures. Another study showed that Chinese medicine improved retinal cone activity for patients with retinitis pigmentosa, even in cases of advanced retinal degeneration.

A more aggressive study was published in Clinical and Experimental Optometry, 2013. She Xiang was injected into acupuncture points UB18 and UB23 and results showed that acupuncture improved eyesight for patients with retinitis pigmentosa. The study concludes that injection of She Xiang into Ganshu (UB18) and Shenshu (UB23) "can improve effectively the function and metabolism of optic cells, promote blood circulation of the retina, enhance the visual acuity, and protect the central vision for the patient of retinitis pigmentosa.”

 


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TCM Qi Gong Fest

Posted By Tori Newton, Wednesday, July 24, 2013
Updated: Thursday, July 11, 2013
Thousands of qi enthusiasts attended the 15th World Congress on Traditional Chinese Medicine & Qi Gong, which took place May 25-28 in San Francisco. Each day, workshops were held, qi gong masters wowed the crowd with demonstrations, and casual attendees wandered through areas where vendors were showcasing a myriad of natural health products.

Created in 1998 by Qigong Grandmaster Dr. Effie Chow, this event was designed to advance the knowledge of natural health practitioners as well as introduce newcomers to the many benefits of qi gong, acupuncture, and traditional Oriental medicine. Held in collaboration this year with the Asian Heritage Street Celebration, it attracted even more attendees interested in learning what Eastern medicine has to offer.

The American Association for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (AAAOM) exhibited at this event with the Student Organization (SO) volunteering their time under the guidance of Jeannie Kang, AAAOM Immediate Past President. The SO spoke with festival attendees about the AAAOM and its efforts to make positive changes in the acupuncture and Oriental medicine (AOM) profession from the grassroots level up. One example they gave that directly affects California practitioners was AAAOM’s efforts in 2011 to collect enough signatures to block the passage of a "traumatology bill,” which would have allowed physical therapists to administer acupuncture and other AOM modalities to patients with musculoskeletal disorders. The blockage of this bill, CA Senate Bill 628, was an important success for AOM practitioners nationwide.


Students Tiffany Tuftee and Tori Newton

Passersby at the student booth were lured in by the whimsical Acu-Man T-shirt, which illustrates the meridians and points of the front and back upper body. Many people asked the student volunteers who were wearing them to stand up so they could see where the meridians and points are and wanted to try them on themselves. Sales of these shirts helped raise funds to enable AAAOM-SO students to attend the annual AAAOM conference and bolster student involvement in the important work of both preserving and furthering the AOM tradition. The shirts will be for sale at future AAAOM events.

The event was lighthearted and fun, T-shirt sales were successful, and in the process, many people learned about the widespread efforts of AAAOM and its growing, active student organization.

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